Why I Want a Wife by Judy Brady

Intention: The intention of this piece is to emphasize the unrealistic expectations society has for women once they are married. Ethos: Brady begins this essay by making an appeal to ethos, “I belong to that classification of people known as wives. I am a Wife. And, not altogether incidentally, I am a mother.” This appeal…

The Wound in the Face by Angela Carter

Intention: Carter’s intention in this essay is to bring attention to the “wounds” that are deeply imbedded in the culture of women’s beauty. She describes makeup trends throughout history, and uses a mouth with red lipstick as a symbol of the wounds inflicted on women, while bringing into question the sense of security of women….

Beauty: When the Other Dancer is the Self by Alice Walker

Intention: The intention of this essay is to show that we are often our harshest critics when it comes to beauty and we often let that affect our outlook on our lives. The intention of this piece is also to tell of her childhood experience with beauty, and how she came to feel beautiful after…

Mother Tongue by Amy Tan

In the essay Mother Tongue by Amy Tan shows how English does not have only one type, but a variety of ways to be used and understood. It is an invitation to see English as a variety of ideas and expressions of oneself. Amy Tan has ethos on the subject of English and how it…

A Woman’s Beauty: Put Down or Power Source? by Susan Sontag

Intention: The intention of this essay is to point out the fact that the standards of beauty varies greatly between the two sexes and is much more difficult for women to achieve than men. The intention of this piece is also to delve into gender roles and their different interactions with beauty.  Sontag uses examples…

You Are What You Say by Robin Tolmach Lakoff

Pathos: Lakoff opens her essay with pathos. She talks about how women’s language is “dainty” and “never-aggressive.” Words like these will immediately do one of two things for a female reader. 1. She will read it and be insulted by the stereotype that she is fragile and in need of saving or 2. She will…

Aria: A Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood by Richard Rodriguez

The intention of Aria: A Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood is to make known and reflect on the struggles of bilingual children in an environment where English had become the primary language for communication. Rodriguez uses first person accounts of his life and family culture to describe what he lost and gained while transitioning from…

And Ain’t I a Woman? By Sojourner Truth

The intention of this piece was to bring to light the hardships African American women faced and still had to deal with. She compares the “hardships” that other groups have felt and to show how different the life of an African American woman is. Throughout the piece Truth repeats the phrase, “Aren’t I a woman?”…

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

The intention of Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions by Elizabeth Cady Stanton asserts the rights of women and demands equal respect as full United States citizens. She uses the “Declaration of Independence” to assist in her endeavor of women’s rights and how the declaration states indirectly of the equality of women and men. The invention…

Attending a World by Mary Catherine Bateson

Intention: Mary Catherine Bateson brings in the idea of women and their multifunctional role as having awareness for their husband, children, and the everyday interruptions and responsibilities of everyday life. She writes about awareness, why it matters, how to focus and concentrate it, and how to extent and preserve it. The invention of this piece…

Speech to the Troops at Tilbury by Queen Elizabeth I

The intention of Queen Elizabeth’s the I speech was to rally the troops for the battle at Tilbury. The soldiers were meant to feel the inspiration and the love that Queen Elizabeth the I had for her people and that she was unwilling to give up in the face of battle. Queen Elizabeth has the…

You Are What You Say by Robin Tolmach Lakoff

Through this essay, Lakoff aims to reveal the “euphemistic, never-aggressive way of talking” that many women feel compelled to use, and how this can be detrimental to women professionally and socially.   Lakoff brings up the dangers of “tag questions,” which are a mixture of non-assertive statements and questions. For example, instead of saying, “The…